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Quiz - 02

Gurudev – Journey of the Maestro through his visual vocabulary

Send your answer to : quiz.rntagore@gmail.com by 23rd May 2020 11:59 PM

Note: 1) Must mention QUIZ No., Your Name.
2) Should contain only correct answers (for example 1(b), 2(d), 3(a) etc.)

1. In which year Gurudev’s first literary criticism of a book "Bhubanamohini Pratibha" appeared in ‘Jnanankur’ ?

  • (a) 1871
  • (b) 1872
  • (c) 1876
  • (d) 1878

2. Composed his first Musical Play ______?

  • (a) Rudrachhanda
  • (b) Bauthakuranir Hat
  • (c) Chhobi O Gaan
  • (d) Balmiki Pratibha

3. Composed and Sang the inaugural song for the second session of the Indian National congress in the year…

  • (a) 1885
  • (b) 1886
  • (c) 1887
  • (d) 1888

4. In the year 1895 R.N Tagore wrote a remarkable short story, namely :

  • (a) Kshudhito Pashan
  • (b) Panchabhuter
  • (c) Golpoguchho
  • (d) Kotha O Kahini

5. Composed his first Psychological Novel _____?

  • (a) Chirokumar Sobha
  • (b) Chokher Bali
  • (c) Sisu
  • (d) Prayaschitta
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  • 1861
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    Born on 7th May at the Jorasanko House of the Tagore family. He was the youngest child of Devendranath Tagore, the father and Sarada Devi, the mother.

  • 1866
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    Rabindranath started learning basic alphabets along with his brothers.

  • 1868
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    Admitted to oriental Seminary and subsequently to normal school.

  • 1869
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    Rabindranath tried his first attempt to write verse and was profoundly impressed by the Bengali translation of Bernardin de Saint – Pierr's Paul et Virginie.

  • 1870
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    Started learning drawing and music along with other subjects and practiced wrestling and gymnastics

  • 1871
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    Admitted to Bengal Academy, an Anglo-Indian School and began to play truant.

  • 1873
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    Visited Santiniketan for the first time. While being there, he wrote a drama Prithviraj Parajaya and took an extensive tour of India.

  • 1874
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    Prepared a verse-rendering of Macbeth and his poem Abhilash (Desire), was published anonymously and admitted to St. Xavier's School, Calcutta.

  • 1875
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    Recited a patriotic poem at a Hindu fair, lost his mother; took part in literary functions, composed a poem and a song, contributed serially his long narrative poem Banaphul (The wild flower) and left St. Xavier’s School.

  • 1876
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    First literary criticism of a book of Bengali poems Bhubanmohini Pratibha appeared in Jnanankur.

  • 1877
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    Wrote and recited a satirical poem on Delhi Darbar arranged by Lord Lytton. Appeared for the first time on the stage in the principal role in a comedy written by Jyotirindranath, wrote his first long story Bhikharini (Beggar) and his first unfinished novel Karuna and a long poem Kabikahini.

  • 1878
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    Went to Ahmedabad to study English; composed some lyrics and contributed a series articles on English life and letters on the romantic love of poets such as Dante, Petrarch and Goethe, to Bharati. Embarked on the first foreign tour, went to school at Brighton.

  • 1879
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    Came to London, admitted to University College, contributed a series of letters with laudatory impression of English society, published in the Bharati, began to write his first verse-drama Bhagnahriday (The broken heart) and wrote one long poem Bhagnatari (The wrecked boat)

  • 1880
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    Returned India without completing any formal course of study, participated in lyrical drama Manmoyi written by Jyotirindranath

  • 1881
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    Composed his first set of devotional songs, his first musical play Valmiki-Pratibha, two of his books Rudrachanda and Bhagnahriday were published, wrote several articles, delivered first public lecture on music and feeling with vocal demonstration. Embarked on several literary undertakings; started writing his first extent novel Bauthakuranir Hat (The young queen’s market) and began to write poems with individualistic note, later published in Sandhya Sangeet (Evening Songs)

  • 1882
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    Along with Jyotirindranath established Sarasvat Samaj, had an experience of first glimpse of cosmic unity, His first musical play Kalmrigaya (The fatal hunt) was performed at Jorasanko, the poem Nirjharer Swapnabhanga (The Awakening of the Fountain) was the key poem, Prabhat Sangit was written at this time.

  • 1883
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    Wrote his verse-drama Prakritir Pratisodh (Sanyashi), started writing the poems Chhabi O Gan (Sketches and Songs), contributed several articles to Bharati, married to Mrinalini Devi.

  • 1884
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    Composed the poems Kadi O Komal (Sharps and Flats), translated some items by Shelley, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Victor Hugo and others, started first prose-drama Nalini, his sister-in-law Kadambari Devi died to whom he dedicated three of his books including an anthology Saisab Sangit (Songs of childhood), was appointed as Secreatry of Adi Brahmo Samaj.

  • 1885
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    Took charge of the Bengali magazine Balak, edited an anthology of Vaishnava lyrics, his first collection of songs and series of essays were published.

  • 1886
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    Composed and sang the inaugural song for the second session of the Indian National Congress, first daughter was borne, received his first literary price – a handsome cheque from his father for composing devotional songs.

  • 1887
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    Started composing the Manasi (group of poems), under a pseudo name published a series of imaginary letters between old fashioned grandfather and a modern grandson, started writing his musical play Mayar Khela (Play of illusion).

  • 1888
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    Published Samalochana, the first collection of essays on literary criticism, continued to write the Manasi poems, Devendranath – his father executed Trust Deed of the Santiniketan Trust on March 8, 1888.

  • 1889
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    The earliest drawing so far available consists of few figure drawings and a bird study in a note-book. Wrote his first five act drama Raja o Rani (The King and the Queen), wrote his famous play Visarjan (Sacrifice) that was staged on 1890.

  • 1890
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    As mentioned by W.G.Archer "As a youth sitting in a lonely room in the family house at Jorasanko in 1890, he had filled a copy-book with sketches". Severely attacked the anti-Indian policy of Lord Cross, took charge of management of Tagore Estate, visited England, Italy and France, maintained a travel diary published in 1891, returned home on Nov 4, 1890.

  • 1891
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    Wrote first six short stories including Post Master and Chitrangada, started a Bengali magazine Sadhana contributing numerous short stories, poems and articles

  • 1892
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    Spent the summer at Santiniketan, toured North Bengal, started writing the poems of Sonar Tari (The Golden Barge), associated with Sangit Samaj, wrote his first criticism on English Education System.

  • 1893
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    He and his brother Jyotirindranath joined their nephews Surendranath in Shimla and Abanindranath in Calcutta to exchange pictures in the form of letters; surviving pencil sketches by the poet reveal the accuracy of draftsmanship. In a letter to his niece Indira – there is a pointed reference to his “dabbling” with painting. Visited Orissa, started writing the diary – Panchabhuter (Diary of Five Elements), a series of brilliant dialogues on life, literature and art, Visited Bihar, Shimla and went to Santiniketan, wrote his dramatic poem Viday Abhishap (Curse of Farewell).

  • 1894
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    Elected Vice-President of Academy of Bengali Letters, became the editor of the magazine Sadhana, wrote the story Megh O Raudra (The Cloud and The Sun)

  • 1895
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    Wrote remarkable short stories including Kshudito Pashan (The Hungry Stones)

  • 1896
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    Wrote the poems Nadi (The Rivers) and Jivandevata (The Muse of Life), Kavyagranthavali was published, composed and sang a song for the 12th session of Indian National Congress, composed Malini – lyrical drama.

  • 1897
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    Wrote the comedy Baikunther Katha (The manuscript of Baikuntha), wrote dramatic poem Sati

  • 1898
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    Became the editor of Bharati, contributed number of poems, short stories and essays, strongly opposed reactionary policies of British Government, drew up a plan for setting up a school at Santiniketan for imparting religious education, published autobiography of his father.

  • 1899
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    Assisted Sister Nivedita (Margaret Noble) to organize relief plague victims in Calcutta.

  • 1900
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    Published Katha and Kahini ( Story – Poems), Galpaguchha – his first collection of short stories. In a letter to J.C.Bose on September 17,1900 he wrote that he had been painting a sketch book.

  • 1901
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    Started editing Bangadarshan and contributed serially for his first psychological novel Chokher Bali (Eng tr. Binodini) and composed poems of Naivedya (Offerings), wrote humorous play Chirakumar Sabha (The Bachelor’s Club), established with his father’s consent and blessings a school at Santiniketan on December 22, following the model ancient forest school (Tapavana).

  • 1902
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    Faced severe financial handicaps for running the school, sold his personal property and wife's ornament; wife died on November 23 and composed Smaran (In Memoriam) – a series of moving poems in memory of his wife, wrote Bharatvarsher Itihas – a thought provoking article giving a new interpretation to history of India.

  • 1903
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    Mostly remained at Santiniketan to attend school’s affair, interrupting literary and editorial activities, composed Sisu (The Crescent Moon) and regularly contributed installments of his novel Naukadubi (The Wreck) to Bangadarshan.

  • 1904
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    Along with J.C.Bose and Sister Nivedita visited Bodh Gaya, the seat of Buddha’s enlightenment.

  • 1905
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    His father Devendranath Tagore died at the age of 88, translated from original Pali into Bengali verse the first four chapters of Buddhist scripture Dhammapada, started editing a new Bengali magazine Bhandar. Appealed to the rulers of Indian states to patronize indigenous art and crafts, took keen interest in founding of Indian Arts Society, Calcutta, took active part in formulating the proposal for the establishment of National Council of Education.

  • 1906
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    He was invited to preside over the first session of Bangiya Sahitya Sammilani (Bengali Literary Conference), wrote a series of articles on the problems of education.

  • 1907
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    Withdrew himself from active politics due to growing differences between Hindus and Muslims and agitational excesses of Swadeshi Movement; wrote an article Byadhi O Pratikar (The Disease and its Cure), published an edition of his prose works, proceeds of which were given to Santiniketan School, one of his major novel Gora started appearing in Pravasi serially, due to the death of his youngest son went into solitary retirement, leaving Santiniketan School in the charge of his colleague.

  • 1908
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    Presided over the Annual Bengal Provincial Conference; wrote his drama Prayaschitta (Atonement), organized Autumn Festival at Santiniketan, started givin sermons at Santiniketan Temple regularly for about six months, publishes a series of booklet titled Santiniketan.

  • 1909
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    Mukul Dey has narrated how one afternoon in April 1909, the poet 'with his mysterious smile on his lips' asked him to follow him to an upstairs room at Santiniketan. "There he opened a drawer, pulled out a magnificient black leather-bound drawing book containing some head and figure studies from life and handed the book to him". Delivered a sermon entitled Navajuger Utsav (Festival of the New Age) on the occasion of anniversary of Brahmo Samaj, His essays on Bengali Philology and Semantics were collected and published in a book Sabdatattva, continued his monthly contribution of his novel Gora, the publication of Chayanika – the first anthology of his selected poems with illustrations by Nandalal Bose appeared, The Modern Review published the first English translation of his short stories Samasyapuran (The Riddle Solved), composed number of songs later incorporated in Gitanjali.

  • 1910
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    Delivered a sermon on Visvabodh – Realisation of Infinity in Sadhana at the anniversary of Brahmo Samaj; The Modern Review published the English translation of his short story, Hungry Stones (Kshudito Pashan); attended and addressed a literary conference at Bhagalpur.

  • 1911
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    Met William Rothenstein, the English portrait painter and Count Harmann Keyserling, the German Philosopher in Jorasanko; delivered a sermon on Karmayog at the anniversary of Brahmo Samaj; Ananda Coomaraswamy who visited him at Santiniketan, translated into English some of his poems with the help of the poet, wrote the play Achalayatan (The Citadel of Immobility), Pravasi serialized his reminiscences under the title Jivansmriti, wrote the play Dakghar (The Post Office), composed his famous song ’Jana-Gana-Mana-Adhinayaka’, sung at the 26th session of the Indian National Congress, Calcutta which became the National Song after India’s independence.

  • 1912
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    Bengal’s intelligentsia felicitated him on his jubilee; described by The Modern Review as ‘an unparalleled ovation the first time that such an honour has been done to a literary man in India. Departed for London, while on board translated some of his poems in English, while in London met Rothenstein and gave him the note book containing English translation who sent its typed copies to William Butler Yeats, Stopford Brooke and Andrew Bradley – all of them deeply impressed. The India Society of London published a limited edition of Gitanjali with an introduction by Yeats; it was hailed by the English Literary public as the greatest literary event of the day, the journal Poetry (Chicago) published six poems from Gitanjali; C.F.Andrews returned to India and wrote about Tagore in Civil and Military Gazette of Lahore.

  • 1913
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    Reached Chicago and lectured at the University on the Ideals of Ancient Civilization of India and on The problem of Evil at the Unitarian Hall of Chicago.The Macmillan & Co. London published a popular edition of Gitanjali followed by The Gardener, The Crescent Moon and Chitra His play Post Office was performed at the Irish Theatre, delivered a series of lecture at Caxton Hall, returned to Santiniketan in November. News reached Santiniketan, on November 13 about the award of the Nobel Prize for Literature to the Poet; University of Calcutta awarded him D.Litt. Degree on December 26. Mukul Dey accompanied Tagore to Ram Garh Hills where Tagore made one sketch of his daughter-in-law and two of Mukul Dey.

  • 1914
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    Dedicated his book of poems Utsarga to C.F Andrews; accorded an impressive ceremonial welcome to Nandalal Bose who for the first time visited Santiniketan. His literary works were translated in principal Europen languages and some also into Arabic. Composed the poems Chhabi and Shahjahan and a cycle of four stories published under the title of Chaturanga (Broken Ties).

  • 1915
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    Delivered inaugural address at the Bengal Social Service League on Karmayajna (The Worship of Labour); Mahatma Gandhi visited Santiniketan to meet the Phoenix party, started writing Phalguni (The Cycle of Spring) and novel Ghare-Baire (The Home and The World), delivered a lecture on Sikshar Vahan (Medium of education) emphasizing the adoption of mother tongue along with English as a medium of instruction.

  • 1916
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    Phalguni was staged. Organised a service camp against Cholera epidemic, advised village workers for systematic tea planting and cautioned against the growing estrangement between English and Indians. Sailed to USA on a lecture tour accompanied by Mukul Dey.

  • 1917
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    Reached Calcutta via Honolulu and Japan, supported the candidature Anne Besant for the Presidentship of Indian National Congress.

  • 1918
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    Acknowledged Hindi as the only possible national language, published his series of story-poems as Palataka (The Flitting One), conceived the idea of Inter Cultural Centre at Santiniketan, formulated the idea of about creating an institution which could be a true centre for the different cultures of the East; formal foundation stone of Visva-Bharati was laid.

  • 1919
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    Supported Patel’s Inter-Caste Marriage Bill in an open letter, visited and lectured at various places of South India, busy writing the prose sketches of Lipika, cautioned Mahatma Gandhi against the use of ‘passive resistance’ as a political weapon without first preparing the minds of the masses; in protest of Jalianwallah Bagh renounced his Knighthood, he signed ‘La declaration pou l’independence de l’esprit’ on June 26 at the request of Romain Rolland; Nucleus of Visva-Bharati was formed, Mahatma Gandhi invited him to attend the Gujrati Literary Conference at Ahmedabad. Nandalal Bose joined Santiniketan, department of fine arts under the name of Kala Bhavan was formed.

  • 1920
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    Took a tour of Western India, presided over Gujrati Literary Conference, spent one night at Sabarmati Ashram, left for England on a lecture tour to raise funds for Visva-Bharati.

  • 1921
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    Visited Helen Keller on January 4 at her home, lectured at Harvard University. During this tour he received magnificent resources as collectives for Santiniketan. On December 23 Visva Bharati was inaugurated formally.

  • 1922
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    Completed his dram Muktadhara, visited South India and Ceylon, delivered a series of lecture at Colombo and Galle.

  • 1923
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    A page from his manuscript Rakta Karavi contains complex figurative configuration. The Governor of Bengal visited Santiniketan, showed interest in the newly formed Swaraj Party and took interest in strengthening Hindu Muslim relations

  • 1924
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    Lived in a cottage perched on a tree, designed by a Japanese Craftsman Kasahar, visited many cities of China and Japan. On board the ship he wrote Yatri and Puravi. The manuscript of Puravi contains decorative images emerging out of erring lines and erasures. He could not proceed beyond Buenos Aires due to his illness and became the guest of Madam Victoria Ocampo, his writing Puravi was dedicated to his hostess whom he called Vijaya, he made doodles and pictures; these impelled Victoria Ocampo to acknowledge him as an artist. He met the President of the Argentine Republic on December 30.

  • 1925
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    Visited Geneva and Milan on the way to India, presided over by the Duke of Milan, visited Venice and returned India, Mahatma Gandhi visited him to discuss the ethics of Khadi, presided over the first India Philosophical Congress in Calcutta speaking on deeper truths of folk culture and folk religion of India.

  • 1926
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    Accepted the invitation of the University of Dacca, representatives men of different nations offered him felicitations on his 65th Birthday. Maharaja of Porbunder sent a handsome donation for Kala Bhavan, visited Rome, Vienna, Paris; met Albert Einstein, visited Munich, Nurenburg, Stuttgart, Cologne, Dusseldorf and Dresdon where he lectured and recited his poems, In Athens, the Greek Government decorated him with the ‘Order of the Redeemer’, reached Santiniketan on December 19.

  • 1927
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    Took a tour of South East Asia where he lectured at various occasion and appealed for financial support for Visva Bharati. Pratima Devi mentioned that Tagore was painting in one of her note.

  • 1928
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    Delegates of India Science Congress visited Visva Bharati, visited Sri Aurobindo in Pondichery and reached Colombo, due to his illness he returned to the main land, stayed in Bangalore and started writing the novel Shesher Kavita (Farewell My Friend), Devoted much time to the new medium of creative self expression, painting.

  • 1929
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    Participated Triennial Conference, Canada travelling by way of Singapore, Hong Kong, Shanghai, Kobe and Tokyo, delivered lecture on The Philosophy of Leisure at Victoria and The Principles of Literature at Vancouver, was invited by the University of California, USA, visited Detroit, Harvard, Columbia and Washington, terminating his tour at Los Angles as a protest against the derogatory remark by the Passport Officer.

  • 1930
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    About this time painting is pursued very seriously devoting much time. Visited Oxford University to deliver the Hibbert Lecture, arrived in Marseilles via Colombo and finallyto Paris to exhibit his paintings at Gallery Pigalle. Visited Geneva and Moscow and met leading writers and artists.

  • 1931
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    He was in London where he had a long talk with Bernard Shaw; his letters from Russia were collected and published as Russiar Chithi.The Sanskrit College Calcutta conferred on him the title of ‘Kavi Sarvabhauma’ (The Poet Paramount), An exhibition of his paintings and drawings was organized for the first time in India.

  • 1932
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    Visited Persia on an invitation from the King, went to Shiraz, Persepolis, Ispahan, Tehran and Baghdad. Accepted the Calcutta University Chair of Bengali.

  • 1933
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    Presided over the inaugural meeting of the Rammohan Centenary and delivered a lecture on Rammohan Roy. Received Uday Shankar at Santiniketan, Exhibition of his paintings and those of other artists at Kala Bhavan.

  • 1934
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    Strongly protested against anti-Gandhi agitation, started writing the poem of Bithika series and spoke at the International Relations Club, An exhibition of his paintings and of other artists held at Santiniketan. Another exhibition of his paintings and the paintings of Santiniketan School was also held at Chennai.

  • 1935
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    The Benaras Hindu University conferred on him the Degree of D.Litt (Hororis Causa), Japanese poet, Yone Neguchi visited Santiniketan; in a letter to Mukul Dey he outlined his scheme for the establishment of National Gallery of Art.

  • 1936
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    University of Dacca conferred on him the Degree of D.Litt;

  • 1937
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    Delivered the Convocation address in Bengali in Calcutta University and addressed Ramkrishna Centenary Parliament of Religions in Calcutta, wrote a number of poems with an undertone of mystic realization, later published as Prantik (Borderland).

  • 1938
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    C.F.Andrews laid the foundation of Hindi Bhavan at Visva Bharati, Osmania University conferred on him a Degree of D.Litt, Lord Zetland opened an exhibition of his paintings at the Calman Gallery, London on November 18.

  • 1939
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    The Raja of Puri honoured him with the title of ‘Paramaguru’ (The Great Preceptor), laid the foundation of Mahajati Sadan at Calcutta.

  • 1940
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    The Oxford University held a special convocation at Santiniketan to confer on him the Degree of D.Litt on August 7. He condemned Soviet Rusia’s aggression in Finland; Spoke on village service on the anniversary of Sriniketan, inaugurated Gitali – an organization for propagation of music in Calcutta.

  • 1941
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    His last address on Rammohan Roy was read on January 24; The Maharaja of Tripura conferred on him the title of ‘Bharat Bhaskar’. He dictated his last poem on July 30, which contained the following lines:
    “….the last reward he carries To his treasure-house….. the unwasting right to peace”
    He took his last breath on August 7, 1941

The biographical information of Gurudev Rabindranath Tagore emphasizing essentially his literary and other activities, is primarily based upon most comprehensive chronicles of his eighty years (1861 – 1941) journey, compiled by Shri Prabhat Kumar Mukhopadhyaya and Shri Kshitis Roy, published in A Centenary Volume: Rabindranath Tagore 1861-1941, New Delhi, Sahitya Akademi, pp. 451-503

NGMA India A Day with Gurudev by Elizabeth Brunner | Accn. No. 16424

Rabindranath Tagore
(07.05.1861 – 07.08.1941)

A tribute to Gurudev Rabindranath Tagore on his 159th Birth Anniversary

Artist's Profile

Rabindranath Tagore (1861-1941), popularly known as ‘Gurudev’, was born in an affluent Family. The maestro was fascinated by the worlds of literature, art, music and dance at an early age. In 1913, he became the first Indian to receive a Nobel Prize in Literature for his collection 'Geetanjali'. He also wrote the National Anthems of India and Bangladesh. He left his imprint on art and played a role in transforming its practices and ushering into modernism.

Rabindranath Tagore was primarily known as a writer, poet, playwright, philosopher and aesthetician, music composer and choreographer, founder of a unique educational institution - Visva- Bharati. Tagore's emergence as a painter began in 1928 when he was 67 years old.

For him, it was as an extension to his poetic consciousness. Beginning with scratching and erasures on the pages of his manuscripts during the mid-20s of the 20th Century, he slowly moved to portraying independent images.

Between 1928 and 1940, Rabindranath painted more than 2000 images. He never gave any title to his paintings. Fed by memories and the subconscious, Rabindranath's art was spontaneous and dramatic. His images did not represent the phenomenal world but an interior reality.

His work of art were first exhibited in Paris in 1930 and then across Europe and America. Henceforth they gained international recognition. Rabindranath veered towards abstraction in his figuration. His works depict a great sense of fantasy, rhythm and vitality. A powerful imagination added an enigmatic strangeness and a sense of depth to his works. One is overwhelmed by the awe-inspiring figures of birds and humans and semi-abstract forms. The energy of his works is counterbalanced by a cool precision and lyricism. Tagore celebrated creative freedom in his technique; he never hesitated to daub coloured ink on paper to give life to his subjects. His drawings and ink paintings are freely executed with brushes, rags, cotton-wool and even his fingers. For Tagore, art was the bridge that connected the individual with the world. Being the modernist he was; Tagore completely belonged to the world of his time particularly in the realm of art. Expressionism in European art and the primitive art of ancient cultures inspired him. Fantasy, wild imagination and an innate feel for the absurd gave a distinctive character to his visual language. His works have been an inspiration to the artists in India as well as across the world.

The National Gallery of Modern Art has a representative collection of his imagery.

Literary Reference:

1) Parimoo, Ratan. Ed 'Rabindranath Tagore', New Delhi, Lalit Kala Akademi, 1989 2) Robinson, Andrew, 'The Art of Rabindranath Tagore', Calcutta, Rupa&Co., 1989 3) Pal, Pratapaditya. Ed 'Something Old, Something New Rabindranath Tagore' Marg Publications, 2011 4) Siva Kumar, R., 'Rabindra Chitravali', 4 Vols. and Catalogue, Calcutta, Pratikshan and others, 2011 5) Siva Kumar, R., Ed., 'The Last Harvest: Paintings of Rabindranath Tagore', Ahmedabad, Mapin Publishing and others, 2011 6) Siva Kumar, R., 'Santiniketan: The Making of a Contextual Modernism', New Delhi, National Gallery of Modern Art, 1997

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  • NGMA India
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    Concept Note

    The Virtual Tour titled “Gurudev – Journey of the Maestro through his visual vocabulary” is organized to commemorate the 159th birth anniversary of Rabindranath Tagore on 7th May 2020. The NGMA takes pride in the 102 artworks created by versatile genius. These artworks give a glimpse of his precious contributions to the visual language. This virtual tour presents the work of art from the prominent artworks of Rabindranath Tagore from reserve collection of NGMA and displayed in the themes of Portraits & Head study, The Human and Mesmerizing Nature according to his composition. Rabindranath’s expression in his visual vocabulary, despite sprouted out later in his creative career, is an enormous contribution towards the shaping of the Modern art in India and setting a flow for the powerful expressive visual language in context to Indian art. Each of his visual expression is very individualistic in nature. But for an outline, to enter in his visual world mainly consisting of paintings, one can see them broadly in two major categories. One of which is that of his observations and dialogues with the nature and the other being the human - the portraits, heads and the figures, which drift in the nature or are emerging out of a space. I take pride of the tireless effort our entire IT Cell headed by Shri S S Paul to conceive and conceptualize the idea of launching Virtual Tours and designed and developed the same amidst lock down period to facilitate our esteemed visitors with the prestigious collection of NGMA. Adwaita Charan Gadanayak
    Director General, NGMA
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Dancing Figure Acc. No. 984 | Pen and ink on paper

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    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
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    Art historian R. Sivakumar dates this work to c.1928-29. Rhythm was a primary concern in Rabindranath Tagore's creative expression. Dance and theatre engaged his imagination. The rhythmic lines of his near abstract dancing figures is worth noting.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Human Figure Acc. No. 986 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
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    Although undated, this monochromatic figure drawing belongs to the early part of his oeuvre, certainly before 1932. Art historian Ratan Parimoo describes a favourite device of Rabindranath to integrate figure and ground. The painter covers the figure in vigorous strokes of black ink and the background is covered similarly leaving the white outline of the figure untouched, a portion of the ground is also left unpainted to make the figure stand out. This painting shows a similar device. Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this work to c.1920-30 and gives it s descriptive title Seated Figure and notes the medium as 'coloured ink on paper'.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Head study Acc. No. 987 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    This painting of a plump bearded man which has little elements of portraiture is signed 'Srirabindra' in Bengali at the bottom left. Art historian Ratan Parimoo ascribes the 'Srirabindra' signature to the earlier phase of his artistic journey. Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this painting to c.1929. He also describes the medium as 'Coloured ink on paper'.
  • NGMA India
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Head Study Acc. No. 989 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    A face in profile lit by some unknown source of light emerging out of the dark is remarkable for its use of light and dark tones. The piercing gaze of the glinting eyes is commonly encountered in Rabindranath's work. Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this painting to c.1934- 35. He also gives it the descriptive title of 'Face of a Woman in Profile'. The medium is given as 'Coloured ink on paper'.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Head Study Acc. No. 990 | Pen and ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Rabindranath Tagore painted this smiling face with dark tones and glimmering eyes which art historian R. Siva Kumar has dated to c.1929-30 and described the medium as 'coloured ink on paper'.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Head Study Acc. No. 991 | ink on cloth

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Rabindranath Tagore has done this strong portrait with piercing eyes on a rare material - silk. Generally Rabindranath painted on paper. Art historian R. Siva Kumar has dated this male head as belonging to c.1932-33 and he has titled this painting in the catalogue accompanying Rabindra Chitravali as Head of a Man.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Head Study Acc. No. 992 | Crayon on Paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this enchanting portrait of a young woman to c.1935. He titles it descriptively as Head of a Woman with Red Headscarf and marks the medium as 'Pastel on paper'. Rabindranath Tagore shows his dexterity in handling the pastel medium and endows the image with an enigmatic quality.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Brooding Acc. No. 993 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    This powerful painting showing a female figure with head bent is an example of how Rabindranath infuses his work with a deep melancholy. According to art historian R. Sivakumar this painting was done c.1930-31. He describes the medium as 'Coloured ink on paper'.
  • NGMA India
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Seven Figures Acc. No. 994 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Like many of the groups of figures painted by Rabindranath, this image Seven Figures appears like a blocking of a theatre scene. Rabindranath felt a very close bond with dance and theatre and this expressed itself in many of his paintings. The dark tones enhanced the dramatic effect of the painting. Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this painting to c. 1929-30 and describes the medium as 'Coloured ink on paper'.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Head Study Acc. No. 995 | Watercolour on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    This monochromatic female head done with broad vigorous brush strokes evokes a pensive mood. Art historian R.Siva Kumar descriptively titles this work Head of a Woman and notes the medium as 'Ink on paper'.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Head Study Acc. No. 998 | Pen and ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Reverse of the painting has writing in Chinese calligraphy indicating that Rabindranath Tagore worked on whatever paper he could lay his hands. Art historian R. Sivakumar has given this work the descriptive title Old Man with Cap in Profile.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Figure Reclining Acc. No. 999 | Watercolour & ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    This semi-abstract painting shows the ease with which Rabindranath handles the smoothly flowing curvilinear lines. The palette is bright and the paint is applied with decorative splotches and rhythmic swathes of colour. Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this painting to c.1936 and describes the medium as 'watercolour and coloured ink on paper'. He titles the painting Reclining Figure.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Head Study (Geometric) Acc. No. 1000 | Ink & wash on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    This is one of the most striking abstract head studies with a strong architectonic quality. There is considerable whimsy in this monochromatic work. Art historian R. Siva Kumar has dated the work to c.1928-29 and has described the medium as 'Pen and ink and ink wash on paper'.
  • NGMA India
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Vase Acc. No. 1001 | Pen and ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    A label is pasted with RNT's seal on the reverse of the painting. Art historian R. Sivakumar dates this painting to c.1929. This painting is specially significant because it follows the patterns made by erasures on manuscripts and yet is an independent image not related to a manuscript page.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Three Figures Acc. No. 1217 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Art historian R. Siva Kumar has dated this painting c. 1929-30. He has titled it as Theatrical Scenes with Three Figures. Rabindranath Tagore was deeply engaged with theatre as he was with other forms of creative expression. This image done with ink on paper showing a kneeling figure on extreme right along with two standing figures captures a dramatic moment.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Geometric Figure Acc. No. 1218 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    This whimsical abstract rendering of a figure has an interesting, textured background filled with capricious, angular lines drawn delicately. R. Siva Kumar dates this work to c.1929-30 and he indentifies the medium as 'coloured ink on paper'.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Peacock Acc. No. 1219 | Ink & watercolour on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    This semi-abstract bird form is a creature of Rabindranath's fantasy. Its body is beautifully rendered by stippling with thick bright blue paint. Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this painting to c.1933 and describes the medium as 'coloured ink and poster colour on paper'. A very similar version of this form exists in another work in the Stella Kramrish Collection, Philadelphia Museum of Art, USA but the application of paint, colour and treatment of lines are different.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Head study Acc. No. 1220 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    An expressionist head study which art historian R. Siva Kumar has descriptively titled as 'Face of a Mustachioed Man'.
  • NGMA India
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Head study Acc. No. 1221 | Watercolour on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    The image is a whimsical representation of a male head in greys and browns done by Rabindranath Tagore. It is difficult to say from his portraits and head studies how many of the faces are actual likenesses of people and how many are characters from his imagination. Art historian R. Siva Kumar descriptively titles it Head of a Man and notes the medium as 'coloured ink on paper'.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Head study Acc. No. 1222 | Watercolour on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    This painting done in dark tones is an example of the head studies that Rabindranath liked to paint where the face with piercing eyes emerged from an inky dark background. The expressionist brush work adds drama and depth to the painting. Art historian R.Siva Kumar dates this work to c.1939 and describes the medium as 'coloured ink and watercolour on paper'.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Bird Acc. No. 1223 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Two paintings with NGMA's Accession Numbers (1223 & 1224) are done on both sides of the same paper. An accession number (150/RT - 79) of the previous possessor of this painting is penciled at the bottom left corner of the painting. Rabindranath Tagore often painted weird and fantastic birds and beasts. They were creatures of imagined world. This expressionistic bird is one such.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Bird Acc. No. 1224 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    The quietly brooding bird is painted with expressionistic strokes. It has an organic form but is nevertheless a creature of his fantastic imagination.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Bird (Fantastic) Acc. No. 1225 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    This image with its sweeping lines evokes some exotic bird form. Its fluid, curvilinear lines are reminiscent of art noveau works. The abstraction of the essence of a bird form is quite starking. Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this painting to c.1930-31 and titles it neutrally as Exotic Bird. He describes the medium as 'coloured ink on paper'.
  • NGMA India
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Figure Study Acc. No. 1226 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Art historian R. Siva Kumar descriptively titles it Woman with Raised Lamp in Hand and notes the medium as 'Pen and coloured ink on paper'. The tonal subtleties of the image are achieved through a meshing of vigorous lines.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Bird Acc. No. 1227 | Pen and ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Two paintings 1227 & 1228 are on both sides of the same sheet of paper. Dated 12.3.1929 in pencil on the lower left hand of the painting. The accession number of the previous collection 155/RT 84 is penciled on top right of the painting. This angular rendering of the bird is laden with wit and a touch of the surreal. It is a wild creature of Rabindranath's imagined world.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Bird Acc. No. 1228 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Two paintings with NGMA accession number 1227 & 1228 are done on both sides of the same sheet of paper. They are drawn on P&O note paper with P&O logo. The angular avian form is both surreal and menacing. It is born of Rabindranath Tagore's fantastic imagined world.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Four Figures Acc. No. 1229 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    There is a sense of theatre in the blocking of the groups of figures in Rabindranath's figure studies. Art historian R. Siva Kumar descriptively titles it Scene with Four Figures.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Fantastic Figure Acc. No. 1230 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Two paintings with Acc. No.s 1230 & 1236 are done on both sides of the same sheet of paper. Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this painting to 12.3.1929 and has given the descriptive title 'Creature with Proboscis'. This exotic creature of fantasy is done with bold, feverish expressionistic strokes born of some dark recesses of his imagination.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Fox in the Wood Acc. No. 1231 | Water colour & ink on cardboard

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    This painting is an example of the sense of mystery that Rabindranath liked to depict in his images. The animal crouching in the dark and dangerous forest is discernible by its glowing eyes. Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this painting to c.1935 and describes the medium as 'coloured ink and watercolour on paper'.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Two Figures Acc. No. 1232 | Water colour & ink on cardboard

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    The drama in this work is introduced through the dark palette offset by the use of red and white in the figures and the vigorous diagonal lines through which paint is applied. Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this painting to c.1932-33 and descriptively titles it Dramatic Scene with Two Figures. He notes the medium and material as 'coloured ink and poster colour on paper'.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Female Figure Acc. No. 1233 | Water colour on Leather

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Two paintings with Accession Numbers 1233 and 1234 are on both sides of a sheet of leather. Rabindranath Tagore has very rarely worked on leather as a material for painting. Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this painting to c.1932-33 and titles it Figure of a Woman. He describes the medium as 'coloured ink on leather'.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Figure Study Acc. No. 1234 | Watercolour on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Along with accession number 1233, both these paintings are done on the opposite sides of the same sheet of leather. Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this work to c.1932-33 and descriptively titles it Kneeling Male Figure with Strange Headgear. He has noted the medium as 'coloured ink on leather'. This reddish toned semi-abstract figure is an image steeped in fantasy. There is a dramatic element in this work bearing testimony to Rabindranath's love for theatre.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Face Acc. No. 1235 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    With feverish daubs of paint, this semi abstract study of a slightly bent figure is done with sweeping arcing lines. It shows the importance of rhythmic lines in Rabindranath's visual language. Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this painting to c.1938 and descriptively titles it Figure of a Man. He marks the medium as 'coloured ink and watercolour on paper'.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Fantastic Figure Acc. No. 1236 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Two paintings with Acc. No.s 1230 & 1236 are done either side of the same sheet of paper. Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this painting to 12.3.1929 and gives it the descriptive title 'Creature with Proboscis'. This bizarre creature, exotically costumed, conveys a sense of wild, theatrical fantasy.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Two Figures Acc. No. 1237 | Pen and ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    These two figures drawn with rhythmic lines are creatures of fantasy that have emerged from the scratching and erasures on manuscript pages. The written words of the manuscript can be discerned below the swirling lines. This is how Rabindranath Tagore started his artistic journey. Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this work to c.1928
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Fantastic Figure Acc. No. 1238 | Ink & watercolour on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    A whimsical painting painted on a greenish background and signed 'Rabindra' in Bengali at bottom left. Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this painting to c.1930 and he describes the medium as 'Coloured ink and poster colour on paper'.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Woman's Face Acc. No. 1241 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    There is a printed label on the back carrying Rabindranath Tagore's seal said to be designed by him and an older classification number. This iconic head study of a veiled woman adopts Rabindranath's favourite oval form. It is done in sepia ink and is lightly textured. The face has a dreamy quality, an elusive beauty with large, understanding eyes. Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this painting to c.1930 and descriptively titles it Face of a Veiled Woman. He notes the medium as 'coloured ink on paper'.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Study in Face Acc. No. 1242 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Art historian R. Siva Kumar descriptively titles the work Head of an Old Man in Profile.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Study in Face Acc. No. 1243 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Art historian Ratan Parimoo has dated this dark, haunting portrait to 1929. Rabindranath used the signature 'Srirabindra' in the early years of his painting career. Art historian R. Siva Kumar has dated the painting to c.1930- 31 and has titled it A Girl's Face. He has described the medium as 'coloured ink on paper'.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Study in Face Acc. No. 1244 | Pen and coloured pencil on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    The strong, linear element in Rabindranath's visual language is clearly seen in this work. Art historian R. Siva Kumar descriptively titles this work as 'Head of a Man'.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Figure Realistic Acc. No. 1245 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Art historian R. Siva Kumar titles the work as Squatting Man and describes the medium as 'coloured ink on paper'. The seated figure with one arm raised shows a dramatic gesture that Rabindranath so often painted. It reveals the importance of theatre in his imagination.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Dancing Woman Acc. No. 1246 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    This image is an example of Rabindranath's bent for fantasy. The composite figure of a bird-woman is seen dancing ecstatically. The painting shows Rabindranath's deep engagement with rhythm and with dance as the rhythmic movements of body. Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates it to c.1931-32 and descriptively titles it as Dancer with Bird-feet. He notes the medium as 'coloured ink on paper'.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Sentry Acc. No. 1247 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    This scarecrow of a figure conveys both wit and fantasy. Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this to c. 1930-31 and descriptively titles it Standing Figure. He notes the medium as 'coloured ink on paper'.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Sitting Woman Acc. No. 1248 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this work to c. 1929-30 and gives it the descriptive title 'Seated Woman'. He notes the medium as 'Coloured ink on paper'. Engagement with rhythm was an integral part of Rabindranath's creativity. The flowing rhythmic lines and daubs of colour ink defining the figure suggest both volume and mystery.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    A Study Acc. No. 1249 | Pencil on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    This image is signed at the bottom right corner of the painting and dated in Bengali 'Rabindra 8.4.1936'. The word 'Baranagar' indicates the place where Rabindranath did this work. Art historian R.Siva Kumar descriptively titles this work Face of a Woman and notes the medium as 'Pastel on paper'. The imagined portrait is marked by the strong linear execution characteristic of Rabindranath's work.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Face Acc. No. 1250 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this dark-toned contemplative face of a man to c.1935-36. Rabindranath Tagore appears to have done many portraits and head studies during this period. Siva Kumar descriptively titles this work Head of a Man with a Cap and he notes the medium as 'pen and coloured ink on paper'.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    A Woman Acc. No. 1251 | Watercolour on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Art historian R. Sivakumar dates this painting to c.1936. He descriptively titles it Head of a Woman and notes the medium as 'ink on paper'. While there may be degree of likeness in this portrait of a woman, what is more remarkable is the sense of mystery that Rabindranath Tagore evokes with the use of dark shadow on the woman's face.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Figure Cubistic Acc. No. 1253 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this painting to c.1930-31. He has also given the work a descriptive title Geometrc Figure with Stretched Arms. Rabindranath Tagore painted several such images with angular geometric figuration and dramatic gestures. They were expressions of his theatrical imagination.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Bent Figure Acc. No. 1254 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates the painting to c.1929-30. Always excited by rhythm, Rabindranath was attracted to the movements of the body through dance and theatre. As a painter, he often represented the human body in dramatic stances.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Sitting Woman Acc. No. 1255 | Watercolour & tempera on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    There are at least two other paintings in the Rabindra Bhavan collection, like this one at the NGMA, showing a woman veiled in black against a red background. Many of Rabindranath Tagore's portraits and head studies evoke a melancholy mood and a sense of drama through the use of colours as this one. Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this painting to c.1931 and gives a descriptive title Figure of a Veiled Woman.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Bearded Figure Acc. No. 1256 | Watercolour on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Veiled Woman Acc. No. 1257 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    This portrait of a mysterious woman with soulful eyes has the typical oval face that many of Rabindranath's imagined women have. Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this painting to c. 1932 and descriptively titles it Figure of a Dark Faced Veiled Woman. He notes the medium as 'coloured ink and watercolour on paper'.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Fantastic Figure Acc. No. 1258 | Crayon on Paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    The seated figure drawn with loosely flowing rhythmic lines is signed, dated and place name inscribed in Bengali.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Laughing Face Acc. No. 1259 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    There is playfulness in this portrait of a smiling face. Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this painting to c.1930- 31. He describes it with a neutral title Head of a Man in Profile.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Face Acc. No. 1260 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    This is an excellent example of the mysterious, haunting head studies that Rabindranath did with great expressiveness. Its mask like appearance is very dramatic. Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this work to c. 1933-34 and describes the medium as 'coloured ink on paper'.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Face Acc. No. 1261 | Watercolour on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this strongly delineated portrait to c. 1931 - 32 and descriptively titles it Head of an Old Woman. He notes the medium as 'coloured ink and watercolour on paper'.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Face Acc. No. 1262 | Ink and tempera on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Rabindranath had a great love for dance and theatre and experimented vigorously with these creative forms. This mask- like head study is witness to his engagement with the performing arts. Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this work to c.1930-31 and descriptively titles it Framed Face. He notes the medium to be coloured ink and poster colour on paper.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Standing Figure Acc. No. 1263 | Ink & watercolour on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this work to c. 1930-31 and descriptively titles it Standing Female Figure. He notes the medium as 'coloured ink on paper'. This painting achieves a sense of mystery in the semi- abstract figure and a measure of poetry in the sweeping, rhythmic lines. It shows some of Rabindranath's typical ways of applying colour with daubs, splotches, smears.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Face Acc. No. 1264 | Pen and ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Art historian Ratan Parimoo has said that Rabindranath signed 'Srirabindra' in the very early years of his painting. Rabindranath has often introduced an element of theatre in his paintings and this is manifest in this work, especially with the red background architectural element painted in the work. Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this painting to c.1930-31 and descriptively titles it Man with a Beak Nose and Strange Headgear. He notes the medium as 'coloured ink on paper'.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Woman Face Acc. No. 1265 | Watercolor on Paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Art historian R. Siva Kumar has descriptively titled the work Head of a Woman and noted the medium as 'Ink on paper'. More than a likeness, it is a beautiful visualization of a woman turning back her head to look at the viewer invitingly.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Two Faces Acc. No. 1266 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this painting to c.1936 and describes the medium as 'pen and ink on paper'. Rabindranath Tagore evokes a sense of mystery through the feverish maze of lines with which he creates a dark background against which the two faces appear to float. These faces emerge from the depths of his creative imagination and can be visualizations of characters similar to those that people his literary output.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Mother and Child Acc. No. 1267 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this painting to c.1930-31.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Face Acc. No. 1268 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Done in monochrome, the face emerges through a maze of lines, bars and smears of ink. Although no date is given in the work, art historian Ratan Parimoo suggests that these monochromatic studies belong to the very earliest years of his painting career. Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this painting to c.1930.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Figure Acc. No. 1269 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this work to c. 1930-31 and descriptively titles it Figure with Raised Arms. Such geometric figuration could be seen in the early stages of his painting. Rabindranath had a passionate interest in theatre which is reflected in the dramatic gestures seen in many of his paintings.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Reclining Figure Acc. No. 1270 | Watercolor on Paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this painting to c. 1933-34 and has described the medium as coloured ink and watercolour on paper.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Figures at the Window Acc. No. 1271 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this painting to c.1937-38 and he titles it descriptively Man and Woman in the catalogue to the Rabindra Chitravali.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Man and Woman Acc. No. 1272 | Ink and crayon on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Once again a dramatic encounter between two figures. The image is marked by strong linear strokes and small splotches of paint. Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this work to c.1934 and descriptively titles it Two Figures. He notes the medium as 'coloured ink and pastel on paper'.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Dancing Figure Acc. No. 1273 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Rabindranath had always talked about capturing rhythm in his art. This semi-abstract dancing form is a good example of his experiments with rhythmic lines. Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this work to c.1931-32. He describes the medium as 'coloured ink and watercolour on paper'.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Lady with Flowers Acc. No. 1274 | Watercolour on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    This deeply romantic painting of a woman in profile holding a few flowers is interesting that in dating his works, Rabindranath uses the Bengali script to inscribe the date in Roman calendar.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Female Figure Acc. No. 1275 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    The dramatic gesture seen in this painting expresses Rabindranath's intense engagement with theatre. The vivid reds and pinks in this painting lend intensity to the scene. Art historian R. Siva Kumar descriptively titles the image Female Figure with Raised Arm and notes the medium to be 'coloured ink on paper'.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Face Acc. No. 1276 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    This silhouetted head study in profile has an element of caricature in it. According to art historian Ratan Parimoo such ornate signature style belongs to the earlier period of his work.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Face Acc. No. 1277 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    The experiments with angular, geometric lines and abstraction of a possibly human profile offer a daring challenge to the viewer and quite radical for the time in Indian art practice. The image displays both wit and weird imagination of the artist. Art historian, R. Siva Kumar dates this works to c.1929-30 and descriptively titles it Geometric Figure. He notes the medium as 'coloured ink on paper.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Fantastic Figure Acc. No. 1278 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    The angularly drawn figuration is common in the earlier phase of Rabindranath Tagore's Art. The dramatic gesture reflects his interest in theatre. Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this work to c. 1929-30. He gives it the descriptive title Geometric Figure and notes the medium as 'Coloured ink on paper'.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Woman Acc. No. 1279 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    This figure study with a dramatic gesture is signed 'Rabindra' in Bengali on lower left and dated 14/1/39 also in Bengali. Art historian R. Siva Kumar titles it Woman with Raised Arm and describes the medium as 'coloured ink on paper'.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Woman Acc. No. 1280 | Ink & watercolour on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Art historian R. Siva Kumar has descriptively titled this painting as Woman in Profile. He notes the medium as 'Ink and poster colour on paper'. This painting by Rabindranath Tagore of a woman with wavy hair has more likeness to a real person than the faces of his imagination.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Swan Acc. No. 1281 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    This bizarre creature appears as a cross between bird, reptile and animal reflects Rabindranath's strange expression of an imagined reality. Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this painting to c.1932 and gives it the neutral title 'Imaginary Creature'. He describes the medium as 'coloured ink and poster colour on paper'.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Face Acc. No. 1282 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    The painting is unsigned. The brilliantly coloured head in profile is a creature of fantasy. There is an element of the bizarre in the stylized rendering. Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this painting to c. 1935-36 and descriptively titles it Veiled Woman with Dark Face in Profile. He notes the medium as 'coloured ink on paper'.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Sitting Figure Acc. No. 1283 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this painting to c.1934-35 and titles it Seated Figure. The semi abstract figure emerges from an inky dark background built with slathering by an ink-laden brush.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Face Acc. No. 1284 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    This is an excellent example of the mysterious, haunting head studies that Rabindranath did with great expressiveness. Its mask like appearance is very dramatic. Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this work to c. 1933-34 and describes the medium as 'coloured ink on paper'.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Face Acc. No. 1286 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this painting to c. 1930-31. He has also given it a descriptive title Head with a Raised Arm. Rabindranath was excited by the expressive possibilities of the human body in theatre. This figure with a raised arm is one such visualization of a theatrical imagination. It is one of the few works that indicates a sense of volume.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Figure Acc. No. 1288 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    This is dramatic figure study with an architectural element in the form of a window or a door. Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this works to c.1933-34 and descriptively titles it as Figure by a Door. He notes the medium as 'coloured ink and watercolour on paper'.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Sitting Woman Acc. No. 1289 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this painting to c.1935 and titles it as Seated Woman. He describes the medium as 'coloured ink on paper'. The semi abstract figure of the seated woman has a dramatic stance.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Turbaned Head Acc. No. 1290 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this painting to c.1930-31 and titles it descriptively Bearded and Turbaned Man in Profile.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Fantastic Figure Acc. No. 1292 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    This monochromatic abstraction of a head in profile is done in strong curvilinear strokes, a hallmark of Rabindranath's visual repertoire. The poet-painter had always stated how significant rhythm was to his creativity. Art historian, R. Siva Kumar dates this work to c. 1929-30 and gives it the descriptive title Decorative Figure and notes the medium as 'coloured ink on paper'.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Face Acc. No. 1293 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    This head in profile of seated figure emerges from a dark-toned background built up with daubs of paint. There is a theatrical element in her appearance and pose. Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this painting to c.1934 and descriptively titles it Seated Woman. He notes the medium as 'coloured ink on paper'.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Fantastic Figure Acc. No. 1294 | Ink & watercolour on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Published in Rabindra Chitravali by R. Siva Kumar Vol. 1 Pratikshan/Visva-Bharati, Govt. of India, 2011
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Figure Acc. No. 1342 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this painting c.1929-30 and he notes the medium as 'coloured ink on paper'. In the catalogue accompanying Rabindra Chitravali, he titles it Standing Figure. Rabindranath Tagore painted this rhythmic abstract form in black or a red background. There is a dramatic quality to this image and the influence of art nouveau is felt in the sweeping lines.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Santhal Girl Acc. No. 1344 | Coloured pencil on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    Art historian R.Siva Kumar describes the medium as 'Pastel on paper' and descriptively titles it Face in Profile.
  • Portraits, Heads and Dramatic Figures

    NGMA India

    Namaz Acc. No. 2626 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    The portraitures or the head study and the figures in Rabindranath’s paintings seem animated with bold emotions, gestures and different techniques of visual executions, which give them their dramatic presence. In his paintings the faces are the mirrors to the inner human essence and the figures staged in the spaces of a drama strongly invoke a narrative potential. This section brings to us the strong and the very expressive presence of the human in Rabindranath’s visual vocabulary. It consists of the portrait heads with a character and figures set on the dramatic stage painted by the artist with a very individualistic treatment for each of the works.
    ×
    This abstract figure is a rhythmic configuration that seems like the continuation of the joined scratching and erasures done on the pages of the poet's manuscripts.Art historian R. Siva Kumar has given this work the descriptive title Seated Figure Design.
  • Mesmerising Nature

    NGMA India

    Landscape Acc. No. 985 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    As a child, Rabindranath spent hours observing the forms of nature from his window. He had developed a sense of companionship with the nature. This love for nature and his silent conversations with it can be seen reflected in various different but powerful visual forms as landscapes, doodles of animal and other composite creatures. Whether it is his doodles or the nature sketches, the lines and colours defining the forms in nature, totally stand beyond its literal existences, capturing an engrossing dialogue with it. These works have a mesmerizing effect on the onlooker which this section, ‘Mesmerising Nature’ brings to us through the visual dialogues of the artist with the nature and its varied forms captured in his art.
    ×
    Art historian Ratan Parimoo has written "Landscape constitutes a major and constant theme in Rabindranath's oeuvre. And some of the most interesting, refined, expressive and mature paintings were done in this genre. They occur right from about 1929 spreading through all his phases till 1939, but the bulk of them are done in second half of 1930s." Art historian R. Siva Kumar descriptively titles the work as Landscape with Tree in the Foreground.
  • Mesmerising Nature

    NGMA India

    Landscape Acc. No. 988 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    As a child, Rabindranath spent hours observing the forms of nature from his window. He had developed a sense of companionship with the nature. This love for nature and his silent conversations with it can be seen reflected in various different but powerful visual forms as landscapes, doodles of animal and other composite creatures. Whether it is his doodles or the nature sketches, the lines and colours defining the forms in nature, totally stand beyond its literal existences, capturing an engrossing dialogue with it. These works have a mesmerizing effect on the onlooker which this section, ‘Mesmerising Nature’ brings to us through the visual dialogues of the artist with the nature and its varied forms captured in his art.
    ×
    Art historian R. Siva Kumar has given this work the descriptive title Landscape with Silhouetted Trees. Rabindranath Tagore was well-known for his pensive landscapes painted to capture the mood of the twilight hours. Here the silhouetted vegetation in the foreground reflects the melancholy of the dying day.
  • Mesmerising Nature

    NGMA India

    Landscape Acc. No. 1239 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    As a child, Rabindranath spent hours observing the forms of nature from his window. He had developed a sense of companionship with the nature. This love for nature and his silent conversations with it can be seen reflected in various different but powerful visual forms as landscapes, doodles of animal and other composite creatures. Whether it is his doodles or the nature sketches, the lines and colours defining the forms in nature, totally stand beyond its literal existences, capturing an engrossing dialogue with it. These works have a mesmerizing effect on the onlooker which this section, ‘Mesmerising Nature’ brings to us through the visual dialogues of the artist with the nature and its varied forms captured in his art.
    ×
    Rabindranath Tagore's landscapes leave a haunting resonance with their representations of an imagined territory. The vegetation, the open vista, the mellow light communicate another reality to the viewer. Art historian R. Siva Kumar descriptively titles this work Landscape with Palm Tree. He notes the medium as 'coloured ink on paper'.
  • Mesmerising Nature

    NGMA India

    Hill Side Acc. No. 1240 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    As a child, Rabindranath spent hours observing the forms of nature from his window. He had developed a sense of companionship with the nature. This love for nature and his silent conversations with it can be seen reflected in various different but powerful visual forms as landscapes, doodles of animal and other composite creatures. Whether it is his doodles or the nature sketches, the lines and colours defining the forms in nature, totally stand beyond its literal existences, capturing an engrossing dialogue with it. These works have a mesmerizing effect on the onlooker which this section, ‘Mesmerising Nature’ brings to us through the visual dialogues of the artist with the nature and its varied forms captured in his art.
    ×
    Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this painting with a somewhat wild landscape to c. 1937-38. He describes the medium as 'coloured ink on paper'.
  • Mesmerising Nature

    NGMA India

    Stupa Acc. No. 1252 | Ink & watercolour on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    As a child, Rabindranath spent hours observing the forms of nature from his window. He had developed a sense of companionship with the nature. This love for nature and his silent conversations with it can be seen reflected in various different but powerful visual forms as landscapes, doodles of animal and other composite creatures. Whether it is his doodles or the nature sketches, the lines and colours defining the forms in nature, totally stand beyond its literal existences, capturing an engrossing dialogue with it. These works have a mesmerizing effect on the onlooker which this section, ‘Mesmerising Nature’ brings to us through the visual dialogues of the artist with the nature and its varied forms captured in his art.
    ×
    Instead of the melancholy, twilit scenes, Rabindranath Tagore paints a dark mysterious landscape with vegetation. Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this painting to c.1935-36 and titles it Landscape with Dark Sky. He describes the medium as 'Coloured ink and poster colour on paper'.
  • Mesmerising Nature

    NGMA India

    Landscape Acc. No. 1285 | Pastel on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    As a child, Rabindranath spent hours observing the forms of nature from his window. He had developed a sense of companionship with the nature. This love for nature and his silent conversations with it can be seen reflected in various different but powerful visual forms as landscapes, doodles of animal and other composite creatures. Whether it is his doodles or the nature sketches, the lines and colours defining the forms in nature, totally stand beyond its literal existences, capturing an engrossing dialogue with it. These works have a mesmerizing effect on the onlooker which this section, ‘Mesmerising Nature’ brings to us through the visual dialogues of the artist with the nature and its varied forms captured in his art.
    ×
    Rabindranath painted landscapes which existed only in his imagination. They were evocative with brooding trees, tranquil waters and a melancholy light. The use of colour was quite accomplished thus heightening the mood. Art historian Ratan Parimoo has written "Landscape constitutes a major and constant theme in Rabindranath's oeuvre. And some of the most interesting, refined, expressive and mature paintings were done in this genre. They occur right from about 1929 spreading through all his phases till 1939, but the bulk of them are done in second half of 1930s." Art historian R. Siva Kumar dates this painting to c. 1935-36 and descriptively titles it as Landscape with Radiant Yellow Sky.
  • Mesmerising Nature

    NGMA India

    Landscape Acc. No. 1291 | Crayon on Paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    As a child, Rabindranath spent hours observing the forms of nature from his window. He had developed a sense of companionship with the nature. This love for nature and his silent conversations with it can be seen reflected in various different but powerful visual forms as landscapes, doodles of animal and other composite creatures. Whether it is his doodles or the nature sketches, the lines and colours defining the forms in nature, totally stand beyond its literal existences, capturing an engrossing dialogue with it. These works have a mesmerizing effect on the onlooker which this section, ‘Mesmerising Nature’ brings to us through the visual dialogues of the artist with the nature and its varied forms captured in his art.
    ×
    Art historian R. Siva Kumar titles this work as Landscape with domed structures and describes the medium as 'Pastel on paper'. The dark vegetation on the banks of a river exudes a mysterious atmosphere.
  • Mesmerising Nature

    NGMA India

    Landscape Acc. No. 1343 | Ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    As a child, Rabindranath spent hours observing the forms of nature from his window. He had developed a sense of companionship with the nature. This love for nature and his silent conversations with it can be seen reflected in various different but powerful visual forms as landscapes, doodles of animal and other composite creatures. Whether it is his doodles or the nature sketches, the lines and colours defining the forms in nature, totally stand beyond its literal existences, capturing an engrossing dialogue with it. These works have a mesmerizing effect on the onlooker which this section, ‘Mesmerising Nature’ brings to us through the visual dialogues of the artist with the nature and its varied forms captured in his art.
    ×
    Art historian R. Siva Kumar descriptively titles the work full of shadows as Landscape with Trees and a Stepped Structure and notes the medium as 'coloured ink on paper'.
  • Mesmerising Nature

    NGMA India

    A TreeAcc. No. 2627 | Pen and ink on paper

    ×

    Concept Note

    As a child, Rabindranath spent hours observing the forms of nature from his window. He had developed a sense of companionship with the nature. This love for nature and his silent conversations with it can be seen reflected in various different but powerful visual forms as landscapes, doodles of animal and other composite creatures. Whether it is his doodles or the nature sketches, the lines and colours defining the forms in nature, totally stand beyond its literal existences, capturing an engrossing dialogue with it. These works have a mesmerizing effect on the onlooker which this section, ‘Mesmerising Nature’ brings to us through the visual dialogues of the artist with the nature and its varied forms captured in his art.